What can we learn from the ice bucket challenge?

That the Ice Bucket Challenge was a huge marketing success is a given. How it actually benefited the non-profits working for ALS, is a subject of debate with quite a few dissenting voices.

However, as an entrepreneur, here’s what I learnt from the campaign.

  • Specificity of action AND cause, help. One without the other perhaps might not have been as successful. Take the case of the imitator ‘rice bucket challenge’ where people were asked to donate a bucket of rice to the needs. Worthy cause, but was not specific.

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  • Making a task ‘fun and enjoyable’ is NOT trivializing the cause. To me the ice bucket challenge illustrates that doing something fun, even when you are promoting a serious cause does not undermine the seriousness of the cause or the intent. (As an entrepreneur and marketer, this could apply to any company as well. When could we see a stock exchange do a ‘walk the ramp’ challenge for companies where managements walk the ramp in office with their colleagues cheering & joining, and they challenge someone forward to do it.).
  • The task has to be relatively simple AND ‘doable’ to get wider participation. I mean, just think of why the rubble bucket challenge / mud bucket challenge did not get the same response. Imagine how challenging it would be for most people to (a) find a bucket of rubble and (b) remove all that rubble from your hair. I simply seemed impractical, though the cause was worth supporting. (To me, the message is: don’t ask others to do that you would not do yourself.)
  • People want to be SEEN doing something good. The ‘pass it forward’ aspect AND the videos were critical to the success. I don’t think 99.9% of the people had any particular soft corner for supporting ALS. But being SEEN as participating in something good was cool. (I know a few friends who will say this is a case of sour grapes as no one invited me to do the challenge).

 But, hats off to the team. Great job done. Keep pouring.

(PS: there have been loads of twitter jokes on this as well.. here’s my favourite on ‘I have been doing the ice bucket challenge for years. But the ice gets over after a few drinks’. Keep walking.)

References –  Image Source

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Author: Prajakt Raut

Prajakt Raut is the founder of Applyifi.com, and author of the book for startups - ‘Starting Up & Fund Raising’ Prajakt personal goal in life is to encourage and assist a 100,000 people to become entrepreneurs. _____________ Prajakt is the founder of Applyifi - an online platform that provides startups a 36-point scorecard and assessment report on the venture's investment readiness [www.applyifi.com], and helps them improve their odds of getting funded. Prajakt is also the founding partner of The Growth Labs, a platform where growth-stage companies get sharp, incisive advice from senior professionals and experienced entrepreneurs. [www.thegrowthlabs.in] Before starting Applyifi, Prajakt was the head of operations at IAN, founding member of a leading incubator, and the Asia-Director for TiE (2004 - 2007). Previously Prajakt had co-founded Orange Cross, a healthcare services company, and was part of the founding team member of Idealake Technologies. While in college Prajakt had founded a printing business and has spent over 10 years working in leading advertising agencies. Prajakt’s book, ‘Starting Up & Fund Raising’, helps startups understand an investor’s perspective, and helps them improve their odds of getting funded. The book also helps entrepreneurs understand the building blocks of a business.

3 thoughts on “What can we learn from the ice bucket challenge?”

  1. According to me, the most important factor was the “connect”. As you said in your last point that some people felt bad for not being invited. I feel a friend personally inviting on a public forum to do the challenge is more impactful than a celebrity in a TV ad.

    Secondly, it was a chain; like network marketing. It had the power of network marketing without any stake. I hardly saw people donating, atleast not in my friend circle.

    Thirdly, it was “fashionable”. Fashion is created by socially superior people. For us and other countries, it was the Americans doin it. There would be very few chains of ALS crossing country boundaries.

  2. Love it…..and live life large was what stuck but certainly would agree – all humor aside, a great post and lots of insightful thinking to do!

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